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Wood Building Material Branson MO

Should deck boards be installed bark side up or down? The answer: Install it best-side up, whichever it is. Think you know the facts? Read on... The overwhelming majority of our homes are made from wood. Even masonry and steel homes contain wood. As homeowners in Branson who are involved in countless home projects, we spend much of our time cutting, shaping, nailing and painting wood.

Branco Enterprises
(417) 334-0791
483 Hatchery Rd
Branson, MO
 
Cramer Construction
(417) 334-4666
111 Sandy Ln
Branson, MO
 
Ozark Mountain Homes, Inc
(417) 699-1303
1394 Airport Road
Branson, MO
 
Myers Building Maintenance Service
(417) 334-0511
461 Sunny Brook Dr
Branson, MO
 
First In And Last Out Construction
(417) 334-5499
819 State Highway 165
Branson, MO
 
Beachner Construction
(417) 339-4700
351 S Wildwood Dr
Branson, MO
 
Cabinet & Design Source
(417) 337-5440
566 Gretna Rd
Branson, MO
 
Baker-Clouse Construction Svc Llc
(417) 239-0925
146 Warehouse Rd
Branson, MO
 
Baty Construction Co
(417) 334-2790
PO Box 6460
Branson, MO
 
Heritage Building & Construction Co
(417) 334-5001
112 Rose Oneill Dr
Branson, MO
 

The Truth about Wood

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Should deck boards be installed bark side up or down? The answer: Install it best-side up, whichever it is.

Think you know the facts? Read on... The overwhelming majority of our homes are made from wood. Even masonry and steel homes contain wood. As homeowners who are involved in countless home projects, we spend much of our time cutting, shaping, nailing and painting wood. We like wood. It's easy and uncomplicated to work with. But our familiarity and presumed understanding of this material can be the undoing of a carefully designed siding repair, lawn chair, deck or gazebo. We generally hire professionals for larger home repairs and upgrades, but many experts are misguided. You may be surprised to learn that some of what you know about wood is wrong. Let's consider some common notions about wood and see how they compare with the cold, hard facts.

Myth one - Cedar and redwood are rot resistant

Unfinished cedar is widely hailed as a low- to no-maintenance material used in exterior applications like decks, fences and lawn furniture. Cedar is my choice for wood siding. But let's get something straight. Not all siding, decking and trim made from cedar, redwood or other species famous for durability are rot resistant. Only the heartwood - the inner core of mature trees - of certain species is naturally decay resistant. Unfortunately, heartwood lumber is essentially unavailable in many species. Because large, old-growth trees are a thing of the past, we now harvest smaller, second-growth material that contains a high percentage of sapwood. Specify all-heart and you may be in for a dose of sticker shock. But if durability is important to your design, you should make heartwood part of your budget. It's difficult to rate decay resistance of heartwood precisely for different species. But broad groupings have been made based on years of research and field performance. Common woods considered to be decay resistant include all cedars, old-growth redwood, old-growth bald cypress, white oak and locust. Heartwood of these species generally provides rot-free performance in an untreated state. Water repellent treatment is still recommended for all wood exposed to the weather. Water repellent reduces water absorption and helps keep wood dimensionally stable.

Myth two - Kiln-dried and surfaced dry lumber are dry lumber

Virtually all problems with wood-based building materials are moisture problems. Peeling paint, rot, warp, cracks and general shrinkage are all related to water in wood. Conventional wisdom tells us that when wood absorbs water, it swells, and when wood dries, it shrinks. Wood shrinks and swells in response to liquid water and relative humidity. Seldom do we buy green, fully swollen lumber. We pay manufacturers to remove at least some moisture. The moisture level of the wood when it leaves the factory is stamped right on the piece of lumber. You may think that you're getting a deal buying the least expensive S-GRN (surfaced green) lumber, but you're buying problems. S-GRN indicates that the wood was surfaced to its finished shape when the moisture content (MC) was above 19 percent - how much above 19 percent is anyone's guess. Believe it or not, I have been called to examine rotten joists in brand new homes. In a recent case, S-GRN Douglas fir 2x10s were shipped from the West Coast, stored in a tightly packed pile for months, allowed to ferment, then installed in a rotted state. The installed MC was more than 50 percent! It was a disaster. Lumber is also stamped S-DRY (surfaced dry). This means that the lumber was surfaced when it was at or below 19 percent MC. Other choices are lumber stamped MC 15 or KD 15 for lumber surfaced at 15 percent MC or lower. But these designations only indicate the MC of the lumber when it was manufactured. They don't indicate its MC at the point of sale. The MC of lumber can soar when it's stored at a lumberyard without a protective cover and/or stacked over wet ground. A KD stamping means very little if the lumber has been left sitting in the rain at a retail yard or building site. Take a look at your lumberyard and see how it protects lumber. It is worth paying more for careful handling. Generally, S-DRY lumber that has been well protected is the best deal for framing lumber. You can also spot check the lumber yourself using a moisture meter. You can buy a hand-held meter for as little as $150 (Wagner Electronics, Rogue River, Ore., 800-585-7609). It is important to match the MC of the wood you are using with the equilibrium conditions it will see in service. The in-service MC or equilibrium moisture content (EMC) can be benchmarked to relative humidity (RH): RH 25%~MC 5%
RH 50%~MC 9%
RH 75%