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Chlorine Filters Clarksville TN

While chlorine is used almost universally in the treatment of public drinking water, there is a growing body of research to suggest that it may pose a few dangers as harmful as those it is supposed to eliminate in Clarksville. While the jury is still out on whether or not chlorine in drinking water is positively linked to certain cancers, there is no doubt that it does dry...

Sophisticated Plumbing
(931) 216-3861
1315 Shady Lawn
Clarksville, TN
 
Jim's Plumbing & Electrical Inc.
(931) 503-2400
616 Ranch Hill Dr
Clarksville, TN
Services
Plumbing and Electrical service and repair
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BBB A+ rating

Mike's Plumbing
(931) 624-2000
PO BOX 3742
Clarksville, TN
 
Wilbur Ray Plumbing
(931) 358-5512
533 Georgetown Rd.
Clarksville, TN
Services
Plumbing Repairs and installation; water and sewer lines repaired replaced and installed
Hours
Normal hrs Mon - Fri 8:00 - 5:00 ...Emergency Service 24/7
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Tim Jurisin Plumbing
(931) 920-2392
2436 Ashland City Rd
Clarksville, TN

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Roto-Rooter Plumbing & Drain Service
(931) 647-3068
1772 Alpine Drive
Clarksville, TN

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All Access Plumbing
(931) 222-7335
PO Box 20592
Clarksville, TN
Services
Drain Cleaning, Rooter Service, Water Heater, Septic Inspection
Hours
24/7

Akers Plumbing
(931) 624-2000
PO BOX 3742
Clarksville, TN
 
Jackson Electrical & Plumbing
1531 Suite A Vista Lane
Clarksville, TN

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Steve's Plumbing
(615) 533-5252
3045 Kinneys Rd
Cedar Hill, TN
 
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Take the Chlorine Out of Your Shower

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While chlorine is used almost universally in the treatment of public drinking water, there is a growing body of research to suggest that it may pose a few dangers as harmful as those it is supposed to eliminate. While the jury is still out on whether or not chlorine in drinking water is positively linked to certain cancers, there is no doubt that it does dry a person's skin and hair and irritate the eyes. The new Royale All-In-One filtered showerhead uses patented filtration media called KDF and Chlorgon that filter chlorine, dirt, odors and iron oxides from your shower water. The media perform well under high water temperature and pH conditions, according to the company and independent research (Water Conditioning Wed, 01 Jan 2003 00:00:00 Rob Fanjoy Ancient Kings and Modern Thrones http://www.smart-homeowner.com/node/8366 About 3,000 years later, evidence of bathing and toilet facilities began to appear in the region, and then only in the homes of the well-to-do. The first masonry sewer appears to have been constructed in Crete around 1500 B.C. At the four-story palace of Minos, workers built stone shafts to ventilate the palace as well as carry refuse to the sewer below.

Terra-cotta pipes drained rainwater and overflow from cisterns and carried wastewater down to the clay pipes buried beneath the palace floor. These pipes also carried water for bathing and drinking. The Roman Empire is undoubtedly the civilization most often thought of when the subject is ancient plumbing. This is due partly to the advances in procuring and shaping metal made during their time. In fact, the term plumbing comes from the Latin plumbus, meaning lead. Evidence of plumbing prowess is abundant in the village of Pompeii, an ancient civilization preserved in the ashes of the Mount Vesuvius eruption in the year 79. Bronze bathtubs were popular, and most homes had a form of running water. Water from the aqueducts flowed continuously to the homes through nozzles, and homeowners were charged according to the size of their nozzle. Service piping was marked with the homeowner's name, and the local "utility district" made periodic checks to make sure no freeloaders had tapped into a paying customer's pipes.

The Romans held public baths in high regard, and they even developed a system to feed hot water and steam into their bathhouses and homes. By about the year 50, the Roman aqueducts consisted of about 220 miles of channels and carried 300 gallons of water for every citizen. The stone-lined Cloaca Maxima (great sewer) invented during that time is still used in modern Rome - although it has been updated with a few machinations and treatment technologies to meet modern standards. With the fall of the Roman Empire, it seems that plumbing technology also declined. It wasn't until Londoners began to build their first water system after the Middle Ages (around 1500) that there was a plumbing renaissance of sorts.

The water and sewer system consisted partly of the rehabbed Roman system, and the rest was patterned after it. But it seems that, for a while anyway, the idea of sewerage and sanitation either didn't catch on or was reserved only for the wealthy. It wasn't until London passed the Public Health Act of 1848 that their sewage was channeled away from the city. The Medical Officer of Health at that time, Sir John Simon, proved that death rates could be lowered if the water supply was clean and supplied through pipes as opposed to coming straight from the River Thames. He also insisted that cesspools be drained and rubbish collected from the streets. Despite the sanitary improvements, 20,000 people died of cholera in 1865 and 1866.

From that time on, plumbing technology and sanitary conditions continued to improve. A lot of that had to do with toilet tinkering. The modern toilet was basically invented ceturies earlier, in 1596, by Englishman Sir John Harrington, godson of Queen Elizabeth I (although a recent archeological find suggests a water-powered toilet was in use in China 2,000 years ago). But the idea took a while to catch on mainly because there was no method of preventing sewer gasses from leaking up through the "loo" into the house.

Then in 1775, Alexander Cummings solved that problem and received the first toilet patent for his S-trap, a sliding valve between the bowl and trap that solved that problem.

Then, when London's Health Act required that every home have a flushing toilet, privy or ash pit, toilet technology began to take off both in England and here in the states. Between the years 1900 and 1932, the U.S. Patent Office received some 350 applications for toilet patents. Urban legends and toilet folklore began to take hold, as 19th-century English plumber Thomas Crapper began to be credited with inventing the toilet. In truth, he had little to do with it, as he most likely bought a few toilet patents of the time merely for marketing purposes. Fast forward to the present day, where thinkers are still fiddling with the toilet. The Emerson Motor Company has developed a motor and 1/5-horsepower pump that adds speed and power to a toilet's flush. So far, only the Kohler Co. is marketing this technology to the public. I wonder what historians of the future will think of that one.

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