Innovative solutions for creating healthy, efficient, eco-friendly homes

Regional Guide to the Best Firewood Deming NM

In surveys I conducted among state and provincial foresters, these firewoods received highest rank, both for heating value and availability. (Even so, it's not bad to have a small amount of lighter-weight, low-heat species because they dry quickly and split easily for kindling.)

Sun Valley Do it Best
(575) 544-3004
1700 Columbus Road
Deming, NM
 
Home Depot
(505) 424-9463
952 Richards Ave
Santa Fe, NM
 
The Home Depot
(505)344-1900
1220 Renaissance Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(575)622-2026
2350 N Main
Roswell, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(505)899-1290
10200 Coors Dr NW
Albuquerque, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Kmart 7755 / Cross Merch
(575) 544-2654
1205 E Pine St
Deming, NM
Store Hours
Miscellaneous
Store Type
Miscellaneous
Hours
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21
Store Features
Monday To Friday Working Hours is :8-22 and for Sat:8-22
Sun:8-21

The Home Depot
(505)327-0710
3560 E Main Street
Farmington, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-9:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

The Home Depot
(505)726-2362
530 Kachina Street
Gallup, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 7:00am-9:00pm
Sun: 8:00am-7:00pm

The Home Depot
(505)771-3523
7700 US 550 NE
Rio Rancho, NM
Hours
Mon-Sat: 6:00am-10:00pm
Sun: 7:00am-8:00pm

Woodcraft - Albuquerque, NM
(505) 342-9663
4520B Alexander NE
Albuquerque, NM

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Regional Guide to the Best Firewood

Provided By:

In surveys I conducted among state and provincial foresters, these firewoods received highest rank, both for heating value and availability. (Even so, it's not bad to have a small amount of lighter-weight, low-heat species because they dry quickly and split easily for kindling.)

Northeastern United States (22 states): Oaks, hickories, locusts, yellow and sweet birches, beech, walnut, sugar and sugar maples, nearly all fruitwoods, hawthorns, and hornbeam. When mixed with denser woods, these middleweights also serve well: ash, red maple, sweet gum, elm, sycamore and white birch (also called paper birch or canoe birch). Ash is unique in its low moisture content when green, which allows you to burn it soon after easy splitting.

Southeastern United States (9 states): Oaks, hickories, fruitwoods, black and honey locusts, beech, sugar maple, river birch, elms, persimmon, hornbeams, white and green ash and flowering dogwood. Pecan is available along the Mississippi River. Black walnut limbs are excellent (sawmills pay premium prices for saw logs).

The U.S. Plains (6 states): green and white ash, fruitwoods, black and honey locusts, oaks and elms. In the southern portion of the region: Osage orange, pecan, persimmon and American hornbeam (ironwood). Mesquite is favored in Texas.

The U.S. Rockies (8 states): Lacking abundant hardwoods, except for oaks and mesquite in the south, most people burn the denser softwoods, which are only middleweights as North American firewoods go. The denser softwoods include Western larch, Douglas firs and pinyon pines - as well as scarce hardwoods, including elms and maples.

California: Live oak and black oak, eucalyptus and Pacific madrone. Also middleweights: tanoak, laurel, Douglas fir and ponderosa pine.

Oregon and Washington: Oregon white oak ranks first among hardwoods, ahead of red alder and bigleaf maple. Softwoods include Douglas fir, Western hemlock and ponderosa pine.

Alaska: White birch (also called paper birch or canoe birch) and alder. Softwoods: American larch (tamarack) and Western hemlock.

Hawaii: Believe it or not, woods are used for heating in the cooler parts of the islands. Kiawe is highly available and also provides good cooking coals. Less common but offering high heating value are mamani and ohia.

Canada: Principal firewood species tend to grow in transcontinental ranges, except near the U.S. border. Basically, populous southeastern Canada holds most hardwoods noted for the Northeastern United States. Aside from white birch, western provinces have few dense hardwoods, dictating a reliance on softwoods.

Click here to read article from Smart-Homeowner.com