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Nokia 9290 Cell Phone Boston MA

The Nokia 9290 combines phone, fax, e-mail, calendar and imaging in a handheld unit. Americans communicate today in two parallel ways: their landline service at home and their wireless service on the go. Some people in Boston, however, are deciding to simplify their communications by doing away with the landline and relying entirely on cell phones.

PAETEC
(617) 532-3200
230 Congress Street, 2nd Flr.
Boston, MA
 
AT&T
(617) 574-3162
99 Bedford Street, Ste. 420
Boston, MA
 
Comcast Corporation
(617) 765-4790
426 East First Street
Boston, MA
 
BT Conferencing, Inc.
(617) 237-4849
150 Newport Ave Ext.
Quincy, MA
 
Verizon Wireless
(617) 441-6790
95 Mount Auburn Street
Cambridge, MA
 
Verizon
(617) 743-8800
185 Franklin Street, Rm. 1800
Boston, MA
 
Reliance Globalcom
(617) 273-8302
470 Atlantic Avenue, 4th Floor
Boston, MA
 
Internet Telecom, Inc.
(617) 427-9535
423 Brookline Avenue, Ste. 378
Boston, MA
 
Granite Telecommunications
(617) 745-5000
100 Newport Avenue
Quincy, MA
 
Reltima, LLC
(781) 569-2182
800 Cummings Park West #6550
Woburn, MA
 

Going Wireless at Home

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The Nokia 9290 combines phone, fax, e-mail, calendar and imaging in a handheld unit.

Americans communicate today in two parallel ways: their landline service at home and their wireless service on the go. Some people, however, are deciding to simplify their communications by doing away with the landline and relying entirely on cell phones. The trend is aided by wireless plans that offer better equipment, lower cost and more flexibility. The communications industry has a name for this practice: landline displacement. A 2000 report from the Yankee Group of Boston found that as many as 3 percent of Americans use a wireless telephone exclusively. As prices drop and as penetration, coverage areas and competition increase, that number is expected to rise dramatically. Going cellular at home can be a convenience, but it also can be a nuisance if not done properly. Success depends on how well the switch is executed, and that depends on selecting equipment and plans that best suit your situation. Perhaps the most important choice for someone ready to cut the landline is the type of phone to buy. Consumers need to be aware of the technologies offered these days - which, although not terribly complex, can be confusing. (See our glossary on page 26 for explanation of a few important wireless terms.)

A few years ago, most wireless services operated on a standard analog network. Since then, a new, higher-frequency digital layer has been added to the airwaves. As a result, there now are three types of phones commonly in use - older analog-only phones, digital-only phones and dual-mode phones that can switch between analog and digital. Having the ability to switch between analog and digital is important mainly for those who use their phone on the road, since home service requires one or the other. Until digital inevitably replaces analog technology it will continue to be used widely across the country. However, analog has drawbacks that cripple its day-to-day use in the home. It is, for instance, less secure, since an analog transmission can be intercepted easily, relative to a digital transmission that is broken into data and unscrambled at the receiver. The service plan you choose often will dictate the kind of phone you buy.

However, here are some general suggestions for selecting equipment that will work well in a home environment: Stick to the name brands Companies like Nokia, Qualcomm, Motorola, Ericsson and Samsung, to name a few, offer many models that are powerful and inexpensive. All of these manufacturers offer a wide array of up-to-date technologies, great performance and are supported by many service providers. Since most accessories and add-ons are developed initially for standardized, name-brand phones, owning one can help the consumer keep his or her options open for these emerging technologies.

Digital is better

In addition to their security advantages, digital phones generally have better power management capabilities. Most run on either lithium ion (Li-Ion) or nickel metal hydrate (NiMH) batteries, a big improvement over their older counterparts' nickel cadmium (NiCAD) batteries. The newer batteries resist the memory effect, in which batteries not fully drained would fail to recharge fully. Better batteries mean extended standby time, faster charges and longer battery life. That can be crucial in a home-use situation when the phone is always on.

Peter Banwell is the marketing manager for the EPA's Energy Star program.

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