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Engineered Wood Branson MO

Since its earliest days, America's relationship with wood has been marked by determination and innovation. Faced with thick forests, the first settlers cleared the land, used the logs for building and launched the American timber industry. It's not surprising that wood was the first export from the Jamestown settlement in 1607.

Myers Building Maintenance Service
(417) 334-0511
461 Sunny Brook Dr
Branson, MO
 
Branco Enterprises
(417) 334-0791
483 Hatchery Rd
Branson, MO
 
Ozark Mountain Homes, Inc
(417) 699-1303
1394 Airport Road
Branson, MO
 
Baker-Clouse Construction Svc Llc
(417) 239-0925
146 Warehouse Rd
Branson, MO
 
Cabinet & Design Source
(417) 337-5440
566 Gretna Rd
Branson, MO
 
Heritage Building & Construction Co
(417) 334-5001
112 Rose Oneill Dr
Branson, MO
 
Cramer Construction
(417) 334-4666
111 Sandy Ln
Branson, MO
 
First In And Last Out Construction
(417) 334-5499
819 State Highway 165
Branson, MO
 
Beachner Construction
(417) 339-4700
351 S Wildwood Dr
Branson, MO
 
Baty Construction Co
(417) 334-2790
PO Box 6460
Branson, MO
 

Engineered Wood

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Since its earliest days, America's relationship with wood has been marked by determination and innovation. Faced with thick forests, the first settlers cleared the land, used the logs for building and launched the American timber industry. It's not surprising that wood was the first export from the Jamestown settlement in 1607. During our 400-year journey, however, we have evolved from a country in need of cleared land to a nation determined to sustain its forests. That determination to make efficient use of every tree that's harvested has led to a wide assortment of new wood products. The gold standard for structural lumber has always been old-growth, heartwood timber, which produces large, straight, decay-resistant boards that are relatively free from knots. Today, efforts to conserve our old-growth forests have made the timber industry dependent on younger and smaller trees that tend to have higher moisture content and other characteristics that cause weaknesses. The industry has responded to these flaws by developing a range of "engineered wood" products that draw upon the strength and flexibility of wood while engineering out defects. In many cases, the result is stronger and more stable than natural wood. Engineered wood products are made by combining wood fiber with glue to form a composite structural unit. Engineered lumber utilizes 80 percent of each log, compared to 40 to 50 percent for solid-sawn lumber.

There are five categories of engineered wood: plywood, oriented strand board (OSB), glued laminated (glulam), I-joists and laminated veneer lumber (LVL). Considered to be the original engineered wood product, plywood has been used for structural applications since the 1940s. It consists of thin wood veneers assembled so that the grain direction alternates between the layers for added strength. The plies are bonded with structural adhesives, then treated with heat and pressure to produce finished panels.

OSB is a high-quality, structural-panel product manufactured in a cross-oriented pattern similar to plywood. The narrow wood strands are oriented lengthwise and crosswise in layers and, like plywood, adhesives are applied through heat and pressure. Waterproof adhesives are also used to create additional moisture control. OSB panels can also be textured on one side to provide a slip-resistant surface for roof sheathing.

Glulam is a stress-rated engineered wood product in which individual pieces of sawn lumber are laminated into a single piece. Because wood is 10 times stronger along its grain than across with grain, all of the component pieces are arranged parallel to one another. Glulam is often used to make long structural pieces.

I-joists, resembling a capital "I," are used extensively in floor and roof framing. I-joists are straight, lightweight structural members that resist shear and bending stresses and are ideal for long spans, including continuous spans over intermediate supports.

LVL is a widely used, structural, composite-lumber product produced by bonding thin veneer together in large blocks so that the grain is parallel, again mimicking the direction of natural wood. LVL technology produces exceptionally durable boards that exploit the natural strengths of wood while avoiding the weaknesses common to sawn lumber. LVL is used in load-bearing applications like headers, beams, hip and valley rafters, and the flange material used in wooden I-joists.

Homebuilders have come to accept as well as appreciate the benefits of engineered wood. Joe Keppler, president of the Construction Management Advisory Group in Fort Washington, Md., said that a few years ago, he thought engineered lumber was "a sham." No longer. "I have radically changed my opinion," Keppler said.

Nowadays, he uses it for floor joists, beams, sheathing - everything but wall studs. Why not wall studs? "It's just what I'm used to, but I can see a day when that will change, too," he said. Engineered wood, he said, is "generally very user-friendly and durable and above all, practical. For example, with sawn lumber, it wouldn't be uncommon that I'd get a call a few months after a family moved into a new house. Once the heat was turned up, many times you'd encounter post-settlement movement. Suddenly, there would be a hump in the kitchen floor from the lumber drying and warping. That just doesn't happen with engineered wood products." The use of engineered I-joists for flooring has become a standard building practice.

The advantages are clear. "I-joists are not only structurally flawless, but allow a builder to span longer distances, eliminating intermediate beams, which would have been necessary in natural lumber," said Jim Cardillo, an architect with Cardillo Design Associates in Mars, Pa. "However, as with anything, you look at the total package," Cardillo added. "Man-made joists require special blocking at bearing points, adding to labor. An additional cost is incurred due to the depth of the joist (generally deeper), making your house a little taller, which can mean adding another course of siding as well as additional sheathing to the house." Your contractor will have his or her own ideas about engineered wood products, and they need to be comfortable using them. It is clear, however, that engineered wood is here to stay.

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