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Energy-Saving Awnings Salt Lake City UT

Homeowners in Salt Lake City have long installed awnings as a way to shade windows, improve the appearance of their homes or provide a shaded area to sit outside on a warm, sunny afternoon.

ICON Remodeling
1448 East 2700 South
Salt Lake City, UT
Service Type
Designer / Architect, Remodeler
Membership Organizations
NAHB - Certified Aging In-Place Specialist, NAHB Certified Graduate Builder, NAHB Certified Graduate Remodeler, National Association of Home Builders, National Association of the Remodeling Industry, National Remodelors Council
Awards
2009 Guildmaster

Data Provided by:
Topp Construction
P.O. Box 57191
Muray, UT
Membership Organizations
NAHB Remodelers, National Association of Home Builders, Salt Lake Home Builders Association

Data Provided by:
Harris-Dudley CO Plumbing Heating
(801) 363-3883
3039 Specialty Circle
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Mister Maintenance
(801) 364-3166
841 E Durfee St
Grantsville, UT
 
Brems David Archtct
(801) 521-8600
375 West 200 South
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Jackson & LeRoy Remodeling
2464 Arnett Drive
Salt Lake City, UT
Services
Remodeler, Specialty Contractor, Designer / Architect
Membership Organizations
Pella, Qualified Remodeler Top 500, Salt Lake Home Builders Association

Data Provided by:
Park Floral
(801) 484-7477
209 East Broadway
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Standard Plumbing Supply
(801) 485-2304
185 West 3300 South
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Patrick Jones
Mountainview Construction & Remodeling, Inc.
(801) 891-3314
P.O. Box 65405
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Kappus Landscape-Sprinkler LLC
(801) 978-9293
2695 South 600 West
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Data Provided by:

Energy-Saving Awnings

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Homeowners have long installed awnings as a way to shade windows, improve the appearance of their homes or provide a shaded area to sit outside on a warm, sunny afternoon. But awnings also can have a positive affect on your energy bill, according to a new study conducted by the Center for Sustainable Building Research at the University of Minnesota, in conjunction with the Professional Awning Manufacturers Association (PAMA).

The study found that in a cooler climate, such as Seattle, installing window awnings can reduce home cooling requirements by as much as 80 percent. And in a warmer climate, such as Sacramento, awnings can reduce cooling requirements by as much as 48 percent. The amount of energy saved varies, and depends on the location of the home, the number of windows, the orientation of the windows (east, south, west) and the type of glass in the windows.

The study measured the impact of awnings in seven U.S. cities, including Albuquerque, Boston, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Sacramento, Seattle and St. Louis. There were significant savings in all cities for all window orientations.

For a home in Phoenix, a warm climate, window awnings can reduce the use of home cooling energy by as much as 26 percent, compared to a home with unshaded windows, the study found. In St. Louis, a mixed climate, awnings can reduce the use of cooling energy by as much as 23 percent, while in Boston, a cold climate, awnings can reduce the need for cooling energy by as much as 33 percent.

"Depending on the region, awnings can save homeowners more than $100 annually [in energy costs]," says Michelle Sahlin, managing director of PAMA. She also notes that "when homeowners reduce their need for energy, there is less demand at the time of peak usage, resulting in overall savings to utility companies and the public."

The study measured energy performance for a typical new home of 2,000 square feet, with 300 square feet of window area. To view charts of specific energy savings in various cities or to locate a local awnings retailer or installer, visit the Awnings Today website at http://www.awningstoday.com .

Click here to read article from Smart-Homeowner.com