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Composite Doors North Kingstown RI

Sprucing up your front entrance with a new door can add as much as $24,000, or up to 6 percent, to your home's perceived value, according to a recent National Home Valuation Study commissioned by Therma-Tru, a door manufacturer.

Coastal Overhead Door
(401) 921-0228
19 Thomas St
Warwick, RI

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Budget Blinds of Newport
(866) 839-4770
30 Lamson Rd
Barrington, RI

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Edgewood Door
(401) 941-1323
100 Alhambra Cir
Cranston, RI

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Ace Overhead Door CO
(508) 678-1350
PO Box 4027
Fall River, MA
Hours
Mon 08:00 AM-07:00 PM;Tue 08:00 AM-07:00 PM;Wed 08:00 AM-07:00 PM;Thu 08:00 AM-07:00 PM;Fri 08:00 AM

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Edgewood Door
(401) 941-1323
100 Alhambra Cir
Cranston, RI

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Ohd Co Of Providence
(401) 785-0284
1 Overhead Way
Warwick, RI

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United Automatic Door Corp
(401) 383-5214
3222 Pawtucket Avenue
Riverside, RI

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Aable Enterprises Inc
(800) 737-7817
1225 Hartford Ave
Johnston, RI

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Budget Blinds of Woonsocket
(866) 839-4770
98 Coe St
Woonsocket, RI

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Budget Blinds of Cranston
(866) 839-4770
14 Will Croft St
Cumberland, RI

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Composite Doors

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How much is a front door worth to you? Sprucing up your front entrance with a new door can add as much as $24,000, or up to 6 percent, to your home's perceived value, according to a recent National Home Valuation Study commissioned by Therma-Tru, a door manufacturer. That added value is as much as five times the cost of a new entry system, which makes an upgraded front door a sound investment.

It's not hard to understand why a good-looking front door can add value to your home: First impressions are important, and the front door is where most first impressions are made.

Beyond increasing home value, a new front door can also improve energy efficiency. Fiberglass or steel doors with cores of insulating foam, for instance, have R-values around 6 or 7, and even higher, compared with R-values around 1.25 to 2.5 for solid-wood doors.

Fortunately for homeowners, there are all sorts of front door options. Among the newest are wood composite exterior doors, a sturdy, moderately priced alternative to wood, fiberglass and steel doors. Wood composite doors compare favorably to the alternatives and are increasingly popular in suburban tract, mid-range homes and high-end custom homes in many areas of the country. As far as costs are concerned, wood composite doors are generally priced slightly higher than wood or steel doors (which cost about $100 to $300) but less than fiberglass ($400 to $500).

What Are Composite Doors?

The word composite can be confusing for door shoppers because some manufacturers refer to their doors as composite simply because they use different materials for various parts of the door, or because the door includes a composite material as an interior component, though the door skin itself is not made from a composite material.

However, the woodworking industry generally uses the term composite to refer to materials that combine wood fibers (made of cellulose, the chief component of the cell walls of plants) and resins (polymers) in such a way that the materials are not combined chemically but rather remain as separate entities in the final product. These materials are called cellulosic composites and can include such elements as distinct fibers, fiber bundles, particles, wafers, flakes, strands and veneers, according to the Window and Door Manufacturers Association.

The elements may be bonded together with naturally occurring polymers or with synthetic polymers, and may be enhanced by preservatives or other additives, explains Rick Perry, director of Industry Standards at the WDMA.

Unlike a natural material, like white pine or red oak, which [has] set scientific properties and performance values, the wood composite material used in door manufacture is made and blended by each manufacturer, adds Al Campbell, president of the WDMA. Each manufacturer can use its own proprietary formula, which it feels is the best mix of material. The combinations for exterior doors differ from those for interior doors because exterior doors need to stand up to climatic extremes.

Fiberglass and steel doors, which do not contain wood fibers in the skins, are not classified as composites, according to the WDMA, even though they may include composite material elsewhere in the door.

What Are the Benefits?

Exterior wood composite doors can simulate the look of various types of wood doors, including those with raised panels (shadowing and all), and may feature any of several wood grain looks. In fact, they can appear so much like wood that from the curb or even from the front stoop, most people think composite doors are actually solid wood.

How much is a front door worth to you? Sprucing up your front entrance with a new door can add as much as $24,000, or up to 6 percent, to your home's perceived value, according to a recent National Home Valuation Study commissioned by Therma-Tru, a door manufacturer. That added value is as much as five times the cost of a new entry system, which makes an upgraded front door a sound investment.

It's not hard to understand why a good-looking front door can add value to your home: First impressions are important, and the front door is where most first impressions are made.

Beyond increasing home value, a new front door can also improve energy efficiency. Fiberglass or steel doors with cores of insulating foam, for instance, have R-values around 6 or 7, and even higher, compared with R-values around 1.25 to 2.5 for solid-wood doors.

Fortunately for homeowners, there are all sorts of front door options. Among the newest are wood composite exterior doors, a sturdy, moderately priced alternative to wood, fiberglass and steel doors. Wood composite doors compare favorably to the alternatives and are increasingly popular in suburban tract, mid-range homes and high-end custom homes in many areas of the country. As far as costs are concerned, wood composite doors are generally priced slightly higher than wood or steel doors (which cost about $100 to $300) but less than fiberglass ($400 to $500).

What Are Composite Doors?

The word composite can be confusing for door shoppers because some manufacturers refer to their doors as composite simply because they use different materials for various parts of the door, or because the door includes a composite material as an interior component, though the door skin itself is not made from a composite material.

However, the woodworking industry generally uses the term composite to refer to materials that combine wood fibers (made of cellulose, the chief component of the cell walls of plants) and resins (polymers) in such a way that the materials are not combined chemically but rather remain as separate entities in the final product. These materials are called cellulosic composites and can include such elements as distinct fibers, fiber bundles, particles, wafers, flakes, strands and veneers, according to the Window and Door Manufacturers Association.

The elements may be bonded together with naturally occurring polymers or with synthetic polymers, and may be enhanced by preservatives or other additives, explains Rick Perry, director of Industry Standards at the WDMA.

Unlike a natural material, like white pine or red oak, which [has] set scientific properties and performance values, the wood composite material used in door manufacture is made and blended by each manufacturer, adds Al Campbell, president of the WDMA. Each manufacturer can use its own proprietary formula, which it feels is the best mix of material. The combinations for exterior doors differ from those for interior doors because exterior doors need to stand up to climatic extremes.

Fiberglass and steel doors, which do not contain wood fibers in the skins, are not classified as composites, according to the WDMA, even though they may include composite material elsewhere in the door.

What Are the Benefits?

Exterior wood composite doors can simulate the look of various types of wood doors, including those with raised panels (shadowing and all), and may feature any of several wood grain looks. In fact, they can appear so much like wood that from the curb or even from the front stoop, most people think composite doors are actually solid wood.

http://www.simpsondoor.com and click Find a Dealer.

William and Patti Feldman are

regular contributors to Smart HomeOwner. They live in Chappaqua, N.Y.

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