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Power Line Upgrades Altus OK

One of the considerations when building a new home or upgrading electrical service in Altus to an existing home is whether to string the main power line from a nearby electric pole or bury it. The biggest advantage to burying a power line is aesthetics. Most people prefer the clean, natural look of buried service as opposed to the cluttered look of aerial lines.

Buildstar
(918) 585-1047
2325 East 13Th Street
Tulsa, OK

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Westpoint Homes
2731 S. I-35 Service Rd.
Moore, OK
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Commercial Contractor, Custom Builder, Neighborhood Developer, Volume Builder
Membership Organizations
Builders Association of South Central Oklahoma, Central Oklahoma Home Builders Association, Certified Professional Builder - Oklahoma St. HBA, National Association of Home Builders

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A-Best Roofing
(918) 587-1426
1411 East 3Rd Street
Tulsa, OK

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A & R Mechanical
(918) 250-6500
11244 East 55Th Place
Tulsa, OK

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Water - Tech Ent
(405) 721-3010
10405 Dorothy Dr
Oklahoma City, OK

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Silver Stone Homes
2701 Coltrane Pl Ste 6
Edmond, OK
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Custom Builder, Neighborhood Developer

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Assist 2 Sell Buyers And Selle Realty
(918) 828-7500
9726 East 42Nd Street
Tulsa, OK

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Cypress Springs Alzheimer’s and Memory Support Residence - Oklahoma Ci
4052869500
8300 N. May Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK

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Aadvantage Exteriors
(405) 632-0009
7100 North Classen Boulevard
Oklahoma City, OK

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Herndon Construction
(580) 564-1100
801 W. Hwy 32P.O. Box 1609
Kingston, OK

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Building Main Power Lines

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One of the considerations when building a new home or upgrading electrical service to an existing home is whether to string the main power line from a nearby electric pole or bury it. The biggest advantage to burying a power line is aesthetics. Most people prefer the clean, natural look of buried service as opposed to the cluttered look of aerial lines. This is reflected in the fact that most new developments advertise buried power lines as a positive feature. In addition, burying lines removes the concerns associated with downed power lines, such as outages or fire hazards that result from storms or accidents. Many communities maintain that without overhead utilities, they can more readily undertake improvement projects, such as sidewalk widening and tree planting, without having to navigate around poles or trim vegetation to make way for power lines. Additionally, some people contend that underground power lines reduce possible health risks from electromagnetic radiation (EMR). While there is some concern about EMR from high-tension wires, the risk is significantly less than from individual residential power lines. "There is a broad consensus in the scientific community that no causal association has been established between residential exposure to power-frequency fields and human health hazards," states Dr. John Moulder, professor of radiation oncology, radiology and pharmacology/toxicology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. "There is (also) a broad consensus that exposure to these fields has not been and cannot be proven to be absolutely safe." Every electrical appliance or wire has some amount of EMR, but the scientific evidence is uncertain regarding the risk posed by these relatively lower levels of electrical current. Scientists are also uncertain whether burying the lines significantly reduces EMR exposure. "Magnetic fields can also be found near buried electric lines," according to Jackie LaMuth, Ohio State University Extension Service. Therefore, this is probably not the best reason to bury the lines. Additionally, burying the lines increases the risk that someone will inadvertently dig into the underground line, potentially causing severe personal injury or even death. The principal concern with burying power lines is the increased cost to install and maintain an underground system. According to Mark Stutz, Xcel Energy, a Colorado utility company, "Our biggest challenge is getting facilities built so we can provide power throughout the state," Stutz says. "Burying power lines can cost five to 10 times more than to build them aboveground." The primary reason the cost is so much higher than for aerial service is because of the expense of trenching and burying the utility wires in conduits, which is the best method to ensure reliability and facilitate repairs. While it is possible to bury cables directly in the ground without conduit, as with the underground service cables for your backyard project, this technique makes it more difficult and time-consuming to locate problems and make repairs. Also, there may be costs associated with avoiding or addressing subsurface obstacles, such as high water table, erodible soils, and bedrock at or near the surface; as well as competing surface needs, such as driveways or walkways. Lastly, you have to coordinate the burial of other utility wires, such as telephone and cable TV wires. Even with the added costs, many homeowners and communities are looking to bury power lines. If you want to bury your main service line, you need to contact the local electric utility and determine the requirements for your area. In many areas, you can either contract with a licensed electrician to run and connect the service, or pay the utility company to do the job. The concept (illustrated above) is generally similar to the process described in the main article, in that you will need to bury the cable in a trench and most likely run the wire through conduit. Then the wire needs to be connected to an outdoor meter (on the side of your house) that will be provided and installed by the utility company. Your electrician can then run the wire from the meter to your main service panel inside your house. The utility company will connect the cable to the power line in the street. Your electrician can usually provide this service, as well, provided he or she has approval from the utility company. In the end, you need to weigh the cost differential against the aesthetic benefit. In either case, make sure that you get the appropriate approvals and work with a qualified electrician. If done properly, the end result can be a valuable visual enhancement to your home and property.

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