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High Performance Homes Farmington NM

San Diego's new Scripps Highlands development looks like most other upscale communities in southern California: attractive, tile-roofed houses on winding streets, set against clear blue skies and brown hills. But the houses in Scripps Highlands are different. Shea Homes, the builder, calls them "high-performance" homes - houses in which extra effort (and money) has been spent to make them as energy-efficient as possible.

Accurate Construction and Development Inc.
(505) 326-0593
Farmington, NM
Specialty
Site-Built Homes

Key Energy Pressure Pumping Services
(505) 334-3818
26 Road 3720
Farmington, NM
 
Magic Roofing & Construction Co Inc
(505) 324-1094
920 E Murray Dr
Farmington, NM
 
Equipment Maintenance Services
(505) 327-6055
1025 Troy King Rd
Farmington, NM
 
Babcock & Wilcox Construction Company
(505) 326-4823
1909 E 20th St
Farmington, NM
 
High Desert Homes
(970) 858-9030
Farmington, NM
Specialty
Site-Built Homes

Liessmann Construction
(505) 327-5502
421 Canyonview Dr
Farmington, NM
 
Industrial Mechanical Inc
(505) 325-5005
3030 La Plata Hwy
Farmington, NM
 
Childers Builders
(505) 325-4203
940 Valentine Rd
Farmington, NM
 
Farmington Construction Inc
(505) 325-1853
1030 Walnut Dr
Farmington, NM
 

Building Houses for Performance

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San Diego's new Scripps Highlands development looks like most other upscale communities in southern California: attractive, tile-roofed houses on winding streets, set against clear blue skies and brown hills. But the houses in Scripps Highlands are different. Shea Homes, the builder, calls them "high-performance" homes - houses in which extra effort (and money) has been spent to make them as energy-efficient as possible. And they are just that, using 30 to 50 percent less energy than conventional homes. Houses in Scripps Highlands are selling briskly, even with price tags starting in the mid-$500,000s, evidence that buyers will pay for innovation and efficiency.

Shea isn't alone in seeing opportunities in energy-smart building. Other large builders, including Centex Corp. and Pardee Construction, are putting up homes that go far beyond the already stringent energy codes required in California. They are part of a movement that appears to be spreading throughout the United States. "Consumers are becoming more energy conscious, and builders build what the consumer wants," said Mike Hodgson, president of ConSol Energy Consultants of Stockton, which helps builders find ways to meet and beat California's code. At Scripps Highlands, solar water heating comes standard, and many models are available with photovoltaic panels to generate their own power. That's natural, given the sunny climate. But the desire for efficiency goes beyond solar.

Windows are "spectrally selective," meaning they are capable of blocking outside heat on hot days while admitting visible light. Houses are well insulated and tightly built. Air ducts are carefully sealed to reduce heating and cooling losses (the typical home's ductwork has 20 to 30 percent leakage). And that ductwork - indeed, the whole house - is inspected by a third party to ensure high standards. There is a price, of course.

Hodgson, who worked with Shea to design Scripps Highlands, said building "above code" added about 4 percent to each home's cost. But, he said, other builders are achieving substantial performance improvements with outlays of 1 to 2 percent. The cost, spread over 30 years, adds relatively little to the homeowner's monthly outlay but can achieve big operating savings. The push is most evident in the western United States - chiefly California, where high electricity costs and big state incentives have motivated buyers.

But there are signs that builders throughout the country are catching on. The EPA gives its Energy Star designation to homes whose heating, cooling and water heating are 30 percent more energy efficient than traditional homes. As of July 2001, about 35,000 U.S. houses met Energy Star criteria - about half of them in the most recent 15 months. Nearly 800 builders have been designated as Energy Star partners, almost double the number of a year ago. As Hodgson noted, consumers are driving the trend. In fact, a national survey by the Cahners publishing company found that 91 percent of respondents think energy efficiency is such a high priority that they'll pay more for it up front - on average, $2,327 more, a third higher than a year earlier.

Click here to read article from Smart-Homeowner.com